Blood pressure – changes with age, time of day (day/night), illness, and how to keep it under control without pills

NOTE that measuring properly is crucial. Crossing the legs increases systolic blood pressure by 2 to 8 mmHg. About 20 percent of the population has differences of more than 10 mmHg pressure between the right and left arms. In cases where significant differences are observed, treatment decisions should be based on the higher of the two pressures. [Source]

120/80 – read 120 SYSTOLIC/ 80 DIASTOLIC.

Goal for adults – to keep as close to 120/80 as possible. BUT NOTE THAT BP IS NOT CONSTANT DURING A DAY.

CHANGES OVER A DAY

1) Blood pressure starts to rise a few hours before waking up. When we wake up, it typically is somewhat higher than it is after we've had a chance to sit down, eat some breakfast. Blood pressure is also higher first thing in the morning because when we get up from a lying position, many of us get a sudden rush of adrenaline, and that adrenaline tends to raise one's blood pressure and heart rate. Blood pressure continues to rise during the day, usually peaking in the middle of the afternoon. 

2) BP falls from late afternoon and evening, and is lowest during night while asleep [But a new study reveals that night-time reduction in blood pressure may be less significant than originally thought]. Previous research suggests that insufficient sleep is associated with high blood pressure

3) EXERCISE BP can remain high after exercise, so take at least a half hour break before testing BP after vigorous exercise.

4) FOOD: A study at the Osaka City University in Japan showed a marked increase in blood pressure in young, healthy men 5 hours after they had ingested high fat foods. The same men were given low-fat meals and tested 5 hours later: there was no increase in blood pressure. Low-fat foods lower blood pressure [Source].  Your elevated blood pressure returns to normal when the digestive process is complete. [Source] Eating puts demands on your heart and raises your blood pressure in the same way exercise does. For this reason, it is advisable to do one thing at a time. Avoid strenuous exercise directly after eating.

CHANGES WHILE EXERCISING/ UNDER STRESS

This is self-evident.

CHANGES WHEN YOU HAVE A COLD/ ARE SICK

"many of the over-the-counter preparations used to treat the symptoms of cold and cough can raise blood pressure, so take care in choosing any of these remedies. Read the labels and look for something that specifically says that it is safe to take with high blood pressure." [Source]

HOW TO MEASURE CORRECTLY

1) MUST take a 15 minute break from any strenuous work before measument.

2) Follow a calm and systematic process to measure: [see this] or this, below:

Taking 2-3 measurements at home per day for a few days – and averaging out (after removing outliers) will set the baseline measurement.

DOCTOR OFFICE MEASUREMENTS ARE OFTEN INACCURATE due to various effects. 

POTENTIAL CAUSES

1. Too little water (dehydration at a deep, cellular level)

2. Too much iodine [hyperthyroidism can produce, among other symptoms, increased heart rate and blood pressure and abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias)]

HOW TO KEEP BP UNDER CONTROL WITHOUT MEDICATION

120-139 is now categorized as prehypertension. In this range, medicine is not needed.

BLOOD PRESSURE WITH AGE

Keep your eye on the top number as well. In most people over age 50, systolic is more important than diastolic blood pressure. "Coronary risk is more closely
related to systolic than to diastolic hypertension at elderly age". "At every level of elevated blood pressure, elderly individuals have a greater risk of cardiovascular events. There was a linear relationship between hypertension and cardiovascular mortality in men and women aged 75–94 yr in the Framingham Heart Study. At blood pressure levels above 160/95 mm Hg, men aged 65–74 were 2.4 times as likely as normotensive men to incur fatal cardiovascular events, and women 8 times as likely. [Source: Aging, Heart Disease, and Its Management Facts and Controversies].
 
GOAL OF BLOOD PRESSURE CONTROL
The goal of treatment in older patients should be the same as at younger age (<140/90 mm Hg if possible), although an interim goal of systolic blood pressure below 160 mm Hg is reasonable in patients with marked isolated systolic hypertension [Source: Aging, Heart Disease, and Its Management Facts and Controversies]
 
WHAT CAUSES HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE?

"In 90 to 95 percent of cases, scientists don't know what causes high blood pressure. Race, heredity, family history, and aging can all play a role, as can risk factors like being overweight or obese, living a sedentary life, getting too much salt in the diet, stress, using tobacco and/or alcohol, and eating too little potassium in the diet, as well as certain chronic conditions like diabetes, kidney disease, insomnia, and high cholesterol. Some researchers believe even too little vitamin D can lead to high blood pressure, although that has not been proven." [Source]

REMEDIES FOR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

A) NON-MEDICAL REMEDIES

a) STOP SUGAR. IT CAUSES THICKENING OF ARTERIES

b) DRINK A LOT OF WATER WITH A PINCH OF LEMON AND SEA SALT. "As we grow older, we lose our thirst sensation and do not recognize that our body is thirsty. Chronic dehydration in the elderly can cause heart and kidney damage, coupled with shortness of breath. An increase in daily water intake and sea salt that contains other minerals will correct this problem. The present way of dealing with hypertension is criminal [Batman’s book] "drinking at least 2 litres of water a day. My blood pressure has reduced so much, I have been able to stop taking most of my tablets for blood pressure."  [“. I have been on The Water Cure for about three weeks now and I can definitely say I’m feeling better. My blood pressure is lower and my heart rate is around 58” – Batman’s book] "When you do not drink adequate water the body will compensate by retaining sodium. That should be a red flag. Sodium is directly related to high blood pressure" [Source]

c) regular aerobic activity, such as 30 minutes of brisk walking several days per week.

d) losing weight. Water can help: "Because it raises sympathetic nervous system activity — and consequently energy expenditure — it does promote weight loss, Robertson said.“I calculated it might be as much as five pounds a year if you drank three 16 ounce glasses of water a day and nothing else changed. This is not going to be the answer to the weight problem in the United States, but it's interesting that activation of the sympathetic system is enough to do that.”" [Source]

e) reducing salt – but have SEA SALT.

f) foods containing potassium (e.g. apricots, avocado, bananas, cantaloupe, honedew, kiwis, lima beans, milk, oranges, potatoes, prunes, spinach, tomatoes, squash

g) reduced alcohol

h) garlic 

i) DEEP RELAXATION (yoga)

j) Hibiscus tea

B) MEDICAL

Reduce your blood pressure naturally, without any harmful medication — such as diuretics that further dehydrate the body. When blood pressure is raised, the body is operating a water-rationing program — it has to raise the pressure to inject filtered water into vital cells. This is why diuretics are slow poisons that surely and prematurely kill. Wise up to this discovery if you or someone you know is suffering from high blood pressure! I am not selling water. I am sharing this information with you free of charge. But you need to know more. [Source]
 
Renapril is of a class of BP controlling drug known as an ACE inhibitor, and it's not unusual for it to be given in combination with other drugs that have slightly different modes of action, such as a beta blocker (e.g. Atenolol) or a calcium channel blocker (e.g. Felodipine/Amlodipine). 

Be careful about advice to increase potassium intake. Some BP treatments have an effect on potassium levels, and you should NOT artificially supplement potassium levels without taking medical advice. 

Calcium channel blockers like Amlodipine can have a side effect of increasing water retention, which can manifest itself as very puffy lower legs and feet. If this happens, your doctor may replace the Amlodipine with an alternative BP control medication.  [Source]

DISEASES THAT HIGH BP COULD INDICATE

Blockage of renal artery